Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Sweeet Cicely

Myrrhis odorata
A deep-rooted, mounding perennial, reaching up to 5 x 6 feet, that is a widespread native of moist woodlands and riverbanks in Europe.
The attractive, lacy foliage is bright green.
The fragrant, white, starry flowers are borne on umbels up to 2 inches wide, during late spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in full sun to partial shade on cool, moist, fertile, well drained soil. Cut back flowering stems after flowering unless seeds are desired for propagation ( which it often needs no help doing ).

* photos taken on May 21 2014 @ Hampton Ntl Historic Site, Towson, MD

Tuesday, July 8, 2014

Navelwort

Omphalodes

Omphalodes cappadocica
A slow spreading perennial, reaching up to 10 inches in height, that is native to northern Turkey.
The blue flowers are borne early to mid-spring, however sporadic blooms may continue appear to late autumn. Hardy zones 6 to 8 in partial to full shade on consistently moist, humus-rich, well drained soil. It is tolerant of alkaline soil. They are easy to grow in woodland conditions.

'Cherry Ingram'
Abundant, large blue flowers.

'Starry Eyes'
Reaches up to 10 x 16 inches, bearing flowers that are deep blue variegated with a white edge.

Omphalodes verna
A perennial, reaching up to 6 inches x 3 feet.
Hardy zones 5 to 8.

Fennel

Foeniculum vulgare ( Fennel )
A perennial, reaching up to 7 x 3 feet, that is a widespread native of western and southern Europe as well as around the Mediterranean. The fine-textured foliage is aromaric. The greenish-yellow flowers are borne on umbels during summer. It is suggested to deadhead old blooms as seedlings can be a nuisance. Hardy zones 4 to 9 in full sun on fertile soil.
Pharmacology: The body converts large quantities of Fennel into a type of Amphetamine causing hullucinations.
Aphids avoid it, it can be planted behind plants that may be prone to aphids as a natural defense.
* photos taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, Washington, DC


'Giant Bronze'
Similar to 'Purpureum' but very vigorous and larger.

'Purpureum' ( Bronze Fennel )
Bronze-purple foliage.

Fritillaria

Fritillaria
A genus of bulbs native to western North America that require moist winters, spring moisture and dry summers. These bulbs require well drained soil and absolutely hate transplanting. Plant bulbs 4 times deeper than the width of the bulb. Divide bulbs at the same time as cutting back withered foliage.

* photo of unknown internet source


Fritillaria acmopetala
Reaches up to 20 inches, it is a native of Asia Minor.
The linear flowers are blue-green.
The hanging flowers are olive green and marked / striped purple. They are borne during late spring
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun on just about any well drained soil.

Fritillaria affinis
Reaching up to 3 feet in height, it is a woodland native to western North America from Alaska to California.
The lance-shaped leaves are mid-green.
The nodding flowers are variable in color.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in partial shade on light, well drained soil.

Fritillaria assyriaca ( Purple Fritillary )
Reaches up to 20 inches, with nodding, purple ( yellow inside ) flowers that are borne on branched stems.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun on very well drained soil..
Fritillaria biflora ( Black Fritillary )
Reaches up to 15 inches, with purplish ( edged in cream ) flowers during spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on very well drained soil.

Fritillaria camschatcensis (Kamchatka Lily )
Reaches up to 2 feet, and is native from Alaska to Oregon.
The flowers, up to 1 inch in length, are deep red to black, borne during mid spring. Up to 6 flowers may be borne per stem.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in shade, requiring abundant moisture all year.

Fritillaria crassifolia var kurdica
A native of mountain plateau grasslands in western Asia, reaching only 4 inches in height.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 in full sun on very well drained soil. It does not thrive where summers are wet.

Fritillaria davisii
Reaches up to 10 inches in height, with reddish-purple flowers.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun on very well drained soil.

Fritillaria grandiflora
A rare native of the Caucasus, bearing very showy, brownish-purple checkered flowers, up to 2.4 inches wide.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 ( 5 on protected sites ) in full sun on very well drained soil.

Fritillaria imperialis ( Crown Imperial )
A perennial bulb reaching up to 2.5 feet in height. It is endangered in its native range.
The pointed, lance-shaped leaves are glossy bright green. They are borne in whorls around the stem.
The stems are topped by large, orange flowers, up to 2 inches in length.
Hardy zones 4 to 7 in full sun on fertile, very well drained soil. The bulbs should be planted 8 inches deep and 1.5 inches apart, during early to mid autumn.

* photo taken on Apr 16 2014 in Columbia, MD


'Aureomarginata'
Variegated.

'Maxima Lutea'
Yellow flowers.

'Rubra Maxima'
Reddish-orange.

* photos of unknown internet source


Fritillaria involucrata
Reaching up to 1 foot in height, it is native to woodlands of southern Europe.
The mid-spring, nodding flowers are olive-green with purple mottling.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 in partial shade on very well drained soil. It sometimes self sows in the woodland garden.

Fritillaria lanceolata ( Checker Lily )
A perennial, reaching up to 20 inches, that is native to western North America ( from British Columbia to Idaho; south to northern California ).
The checkered greenish-yellow and purple flowers are borne during spring.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on very well drained soil.

Fritillaria meleagris ( Guinea Hen Flower )
Reaching up to 15 inches in height, it is native to meadows in Europe.
The linear leaves are gray-green.
The nodding white and heavily mottled deep reddish-purple flowers, up to 1.5 inches in length, are borne during mid-spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial to full shade on moist, humus-rich, well drained soil. It thrives in the woodland environment.
Drought tolerant while dormant but requires consistent moisture during spring. The bulbs should be planted 5 inches deep and 6 inches apart during early autumn. Deer resistant.

'Alba'
White flowers.

Fritillaria michailovskyi
A native to the Turkish mountains, it reaches up to 1 foot in height.
The very attractive, deep reddish-purple flowers, up to 1 inch in length, are edged in yellow. Up to 5 flowers may be borne per stem during late spring.
The oblanceolate leaves are mid-green.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun on very well drained soil.

Fritillaria pallidiflora
Reaching up to 16 inches in height.
The attractive, lance-shaped leaves are gray-green.
The showy, bright greenish-yellow, nodding flowers, up to 1.5 inches in length, are borne on clusters during mid-spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial shade on moist, well drained soil. This easy to grow bulbaceous perennial often self sows in the woodland garden.

Fritillaria persica ( Yellow Fritillary )
Reaching up to 3 feet x 8 inches in size, it is native to western Asia from Turkey to Iraq. It is endangered in its natural range. It looks best planted in groups.
The narrow, lance-shaped leaves are gray-green.
The fragrant flowers, up to 1 inch wide, are deep purple. The very abundant flowers may number up to 30 per stem.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 in full sun on fertile, very well drained soil, it needs protection from late spring frosts. The bulbs should be planted 6 inches deep and 1 foot apart during early to mid autumn.

Fritillaria pudica
Reaches up to 6 inches in height, it is native to mountains of the western U.S.
The lance-shaped leaves are mid-green.
The fragrant flowers are borne during early spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun on very well drained soil.

Fritillaria raddeana Closely related to F. imperialis, it reaches up to 2.5 feet in height. It is native to northeastern Iran. The fragrant, creamy-yellow flowers are borne during early spring. Hardy zones 5 to 9, late spring freezes may be a problem.

Fritillaria recurva ( Scarlet Fritillaria )
Reaches up to 3 feet, and is native to the western U.S., from southern Oregon; south to northern California to nw Nevada.
The scarlet ( checkered yellow on the inside ) flowers are borne during spring.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in light shade. Very hardy and adaptable, thriving in much of the U.S. and southern Canada.

Fritillaria thunbergii
The foliage is grassy
It prefers full sun and moist soil.

Fritillaria purdyi
The leaves, up to 6 inches in length, form a rosette.
The white ( striped reddish-brown ) flowers are borne on a stem up to 6 inches high. Up to 7 flowers may be borne per stem.
Hardy zones 5 to 8.

Fritillaria uva-vulpis
Reaches up to 1.5 feet in height.
The narrow lance-shaped leaves are gray.
The flowers are purple with yellow petal tips.
Hardy zones 3 to 8.

Fritillaria verticillata
Reaches up to 2 feet in height and is native to the mountains of central Asia.
The leaves are narrow and grass-like.
The flowers, up to 1.5 inches in length, are nodding and white to pale yellow. There is purple spotting on the inside.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun on moist, well drained soil.

Lady's Slipper Orchid

Cypripedium
Cypripedium acaule ( Pink Lady's Slipper )
A perennial, that with ideal condition can form a large colony moderately fast.
It requires partial shade on very acidic soil. Pine needle mulch is recommended.

Cypripedium calceolus ( Yellow Lady's Slipper )
A long-lived perennial that can eventually form a large clump.
It requires partial shade ( with shade during hottest part of the day ) and alkaline, moist, well drained soil.

Cypripedium japonicus

* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, Washington, DC


Cypripedium reginae ( Showy Lady's Slipper )

* photo taken by Mike Homoya. USDA NRCS. 1995. Northeast wetland flora

Cypridedium macranthon
A perennial, reaching up to 16 inches in height.
The ovate or oblong leaves are mid-green.
The flowers, to 4 inches are pink and purplish-white ( white forms exist )
Hardy zones 4 + on light, well drained soil.

Cypripedium reginae ( Showy Lady's Slipper )
A perennial, reaching up to 3 feet, that is native to acidic large / black spruce bogs, mostly in the boreal forest region of Canada. It is uncommon in Ontario, threarened in Manitoba & Quebec, nearly extinct in Saskatchewan, New Brunswick, PEI & Newfoundland. Deer and habitat loss are furthering its decline.
The pink ( with white petals and sepals ) flowers are borne during mid-summer.
Transplanting from the wild is illegal and reckless, since transplants rarely survive and re-establish.

Moonseed

Cocculus carolininus ( Carolina Moonseed )
A fast growing, twining vine, reaching up to 15 feet, that is native to the midwest and southeastern U.S. It is great for covering a chain link fence. The leaves, up to 4 inches in length, are glossy deep green. The small, yellow-green flowers are borne during spring. The vines are smothered with showy, scarlet-red fruits, up to 0.25 inches, throughout autumn. The fruits are borne on hanging racemes up to 4 inches in length. Hardy zones 6 to 9 in sun or shade on just about any acidic well drained soil.

Cocculus trilobus ( Korean Moonseed )
A woody-based perennial vine, reaching up to 23 feet, that is native to woodlands of Korea.
The attractive foliage turns yellow during autumn.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on fertile, humus-rich, well drained soil.

Equisetum

Equisetum Equisetum hyemale ( Dutch Rush )
A perennial, reaching up to 5 ( rarely 10 feet ) in height, that is native to Europe ( except southern coast ), Asia and North America.
The stout upright, bamboo-like stems are green with internodes 4 inches apart.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in partial shade. Propagation is from division.

* photos taken on Mar 7 2013 in Wheaton, MD

Foxtail Lily

Eremurus
Thrives in full sun on neutral to very alkaline, fertile, well drained soil ( it is important to not plant to close to other plants which may block sunlight from the foliage ). Propagation is from division or seed for the species.
The cut flower stalks make stunning flower arrangements but on most of these look so great in the garden who would want to cut them.
They are best planted in the back of the border or with plants that develop very late in the season. Do not plant annuals close too close to where Eremurus grow in the garden since you risk accidently damaging the roots and loosing the plant.

Eremurus aitchisonii
Reaches up to 6.5 feet in height, bearing thick, white flower spires.

Eremurus himalaicus
A perennial, reaching up to 8 x 2.5 ( rarely over 6 ) feet, that is native from Tajikistan & Afghanistan to the northwest Himalayas; south to Kashmir and northern India.
The leaves, up to 36 x 2.5 ( rarely over 24 ) inches, are bright green to blue-green. The foliage is often used as a vegetable in its native range.
The pure white flowers, up to 1.3 inches across, are borne on spikes, up to 32 inches in length, during late spring into early summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun on just about any well drained soil. Plant on a slope or a raised bed where winter wetness is a problem.

Eremurus x isabellinus
The hybrids between Eremurus olgae & E. stenophyllus. The foliage clump on these moderately fast growing perennials is usually up to 20 x 20 inches in size, the flower stalks much taller. The fragrant flowers are borne early to mid summer, the plant goes dormant after that. The flowers attract butterflies. Hardy zones 5 to 8 ( protected sites with deep winter mulch recommended north of 7 ) in full sun on light, well drained soil. The flower stalks may need to be staked on windy sites. The bulbs are planted 5 inches deep and 10 inches apart during early autumn.

'Brutus'
Reaches up to 6 feet in height, bearing pure white flowers.

'Cleopatra'
Very vigorous, reaching up to 5.5 feet, with intense deep orange blooms. It is absolutely stunning in bloom.
The foliage is deep green.

'Emmy Ro'
Reaches up to 7 feet in height, bearing flowers that are bright orange on the outside, pale yellow on the inside.

'Oase'
Reaches up 6 feet, bearing flowers that are pale pink, later fading to yellow.
The foliage is blue-green.

'Pinokkio'
Reaches up to 6 feet, bearing flowers that are deep orange in bud, opening to intense deep yellow.
It is absolutely stunning in bloom.

'Roford'
Reaches up to 5.5 feet, with intense salmon-pink flowers. It is stunning in bloom, especially when mixed with equally tall deep flowers.

'Romance'
Reaches up to 6 feet in height, bearing dense, bright salmon-pink flower plumes.
The flowers appear late spring and are long lasting into early summer.

'Yellow Giant'
Bears broad, intensely deep golden-yellow flower plumes up to 8 ( reports of 10 ) feet in height.

Eremurus olgae
Reaches up to 6.5 feet, this central Asian native bears huge spikes or pale pink flowers during early to mid summer.

Eremurus regelii
Reaches up to 8 feet in height, bearing abundant, reddish-brown flowers on narrow spires during late spring into early summer.
It is native to Uzbekistan.

Eremurus robustus
A perennial, reaching up to 10 x 4 feet, that is native from Turkestan to Afghanistan.
The leaves, up to 4 ( rarely over 3.3 ) feet in length, are blue-green.
The very pale pink flowers, up to 1.5 inches across, are borne on large spikes during early summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun, it is more wind and winter moisture tolerant than other Eremurus but still requires a well drained site.

Eremurus stenophyllus
A perennial, reaching up to 4 x 2 feet, that is native from Iran to Turkestan.
The leaves, up to 12 x 0.5 inches, are gray-green.
The bright yellow flowers, up to 0.7 inches across, are borne on spikes during early summer.

Dracocephalum

Dracocephalum

Dracocephalum ruyschianum 'Blue Dragon'

* photo taken on Sep 23 2013 in Burtonsville, MD

* photos taken on June 22 2014 in Howard Co., MD

Shooting Star

Dodecatheon
A genus of perennials native to North America. They prefer full sun to partial shade on humus-rich, well drained soil. Propagation is from seed sown upon ripening or root division.

Dodecatheon hendersonii ( Henderson's Shooting Star )
Native to western North America from British Columbia to southern California.

Dodecatheon jeffreyi ( Jeffrey's Shooting Star )
A perennial, reaching a maximum height of 2.5 feet in height, that is native to the western U.S. ( Coastal Alaska to western Montana; south to central California to Wyoming ).
The leaves are up to 1.5 feet in length.
The lavender-pink flowers are borne on huge clusters of up to 24 individual blooms.

Dodecatheon media ( Eastern Snooting Star )
A perennial, reaching up to 16 x 10 inches in size, that is native to prairies and open woods in eastern North America ( southern Manitoba to central New York State; south to central Texas to northern Florida ).
The leaves, up to 6 inches in length, are deep green.
Up to 15 deep pink ( less often white ) flowers may be borne on a single stem up to 2 feet in height, during late spring into early summer. The flower petals are up to 1 inch in length.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in partial shade.

* photos taken by Jennifer Anderson @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Dodecatheon pulchellum ( Dark Throat Shooting Star )
A perennial, native to western North America ( central Alaska to Manitoba; south to mountains of California to New Mexico )

* photo taken by Mr. & Mrs. Robert G. Young @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database
Distylium

Datisca

Datisca cannabina ( False Hemp )
A bushy perennial, reaching up to 7 feet in height.
The bright green foliage is almost clefted to the center.
The greenish-yellow flowers are borne mid to late summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun.

Disanthus

>Disanthus
Text description coming soon.
Hardy zones 5 to 7.

* photos taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum DC

Dahlia

Dahlia
Tuberous perennials, south of zone 7. In colder climates that are planted out during the frost free season with the tubers stored over winter in a cool greenhouse or cellar. They should be planted once all chance of frost has passed. Dahlias are best planted to a depth where at least 2 inches of soil covers the top of the tuber. Throwing some bone meal into the planting hole will encourage quick establishment. They prefer full sun on moist, humus-rich, well drained soil. Dahlias prefer at least 1 inch of water per week during summer, otherwise wilting and stunted growth may result. Drip irriagation or hand watering is best, since wetting the foliage too often may encourage disease. Voles may damage of eat the tubers...putting mothballs in the planting holes may discourage this.


* photos taken on Aug 30 2012 in Columbia, MD

* photos taken on May 15 2013 in Ellicott City, MD

* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, Washington, DC

* photo taken on Aug 15 2013 in Ellicott City, MD

* photos taken on Oct 17 2013 @ Agricultural History Farm Park, Derwood, MD


Hypnotica Dark Night

* photos taken on June 10 2013 in Columbia, MD


Hypnotica Red

* photos taken on June 10 2013 in Columbia, MD