Friday, September 5, 2014

American Umbrella-Leaf

Diphylleia cymosa
A rhizomatous, dense, clumping perennial, reaching up to 3.3 x 3 + feet in height, that is native to woodlands in the Blue Ridge Mountains of the eastern U.S. ( eastern Tennessee, southwest Virginia; south to far northern Georgia and western North Carolina ). It is related to Podophyllum. The toothed, peltate leaves, up to 22 inches wide, are deep green.
The white, bowl-shaped flowers are borne on terminal cymes mid to late spring.
They are followed by blue berries.
Hardy zones 4 to 7 in partial to full shade on just about any moist to wet, humus-rich soil. Native to mount

* photos taken by Mark A. Garland @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Chameleon Plant

Houttuynia cordata ( Chameleon Plant )
A very fast growing, rhizomatous perennial, reaching up to 20 ( rarely over 15 ) inches in height, that is native from Nepal to China to Japan; south to mountains of Java.
The scented, heart-shaped leaves are up to 3 inches in length. The foliage is valued both fresh and cooked in the same way as spinach in China.
The white flowers, up to 0.5 inches wide, are borne during early summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in partial shade on moist soil. Propagation is from division or root cuttings. Due to its invasive spread potential, it is recommended to keep this plant in a contained area.

* photos taken on Aug 15 2014 at Maryland Zoo, Baltimore, MD


'Chameleon'
Attractive foliage splashed in white, pink and red, otherwise identical to species.

* photo taken on June 1 2014 in Columbia, MD

* photo taken on Aug 24 2014 in Columbia, MD

Saturday, August 9, 2014

Mullein

Verbascum
Deer resistant.

* photo taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, Washington, DC

* photo taken @ Smithsonian Inst, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014


Verbascum blattaria ( Moth Mullein )
A perennial, reaching up to 6 x 1.5 feet, that is native to temperate Eurasia.
The crinkled, glossy deep green leaves form a basal rosette.
The white to pale yellow flowers are borne during summer.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 in full sun on dryish, well drained soil. Propagation is from seed.

'Albiflorum'
The flowers are pure white with a purple center.

Verbascum bombyciferum
A short-lived perennial, reaching up to 4 x 3 ( rarely 6 ) feet, that is native to Turkey and Asia Minor.
The felted, ovate leaves, up to 18 inches in length, are silvery-white as are the stems. The basal leaves are evergreen.
The bright yellow flowers, up to 2 inches across, are borne during mid-summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in full sun on dry, sandy, well drained soil. Propagation is from seed, division during spring or root cuttings during winter.

'Arctic Summer'
Spectacular, with golden-yellow flower plumes reaching up to 8 feet in height.

Verbascum chiaxii ( Nettle-Leaved Mullein )
A thick, clump-forming perenial, reaching up to 5 x 2 ( rarely over 3 ) feet in size, that is native to Europe.
The ovate leaves are hairy, glossy deep green.
The bright yellow flowers are borne during mid-summer.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun on alkaline, very well drained soil. Very easy to grow.

'Alba'
White flowers, otherwise identical.

Verbascum 'Helen Johnson
An evergreen perennial reaching up to 3 x 2.5 ( rarely over 2 ) feet.
The ovate leaves are downy grayish-green.
The pinkish flowers are borne on upright spikes all summer long.

Verbascum 'Jackie'
An evergreen perennial reaching up to 3 x 2.5 ( rarely over 2 ) feet.
The ovate leaves are downy grayish-green.
The pale pink ( with purple eye ) flowers are borne on upright spikes all summer long.

Verbascum nigrum ( Dark Mullein )
A perennial, reaching up to 3 x 2 feet.
The ovate leaves are deep green.
The yellow flowers are borne mid-summer into early autumn.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun on alkaline, very well drained soil.

Verbascum olympicum ( Olympic Mullein )
A short-lived perennial, reaching up to 10 x 3 feet, that is native from Greece to Turkey.
The pointed, narrow leaves are grayish-white and woolly. The stems are also woolly and grayish-white.
The bright yellow flowers are borne summer into autumn.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 in full sun. Propagation is from seed.

Verbascum phoeniceum ( Purple Mullein )
A perennial, reaching up to 6.5 x 2 feet.
The pointed leaves are mid-green.
The blooms appear during early summer lasting about 2 weeks.
Hardy zones 3b to 8

Gainsborough'
Bright yellow flowers.

;'Mont Blanc'
Silvery foliage and pure white flowers.

'Pink Domino'
Rose-pink flowers.

Verbascum 'Southern Charm'
A perennial, reaching up to 2.5 x 2 feet.
It often reblooms after deadheading.

Verbascum thapsus ( Flannel Mullein )
A short-lived perennial, reaching up to 6.5 x 1.5 feet, that is native to temperate Eurasia.
The basal leaves, up to 18 inches in length, are felted, grayish-white.
The yellow flowers are borne during mid to late summer.
Hardy zones 3 to 7. Propagation is from division or seed.

False Hellebore

Veratrum
A genus of coarse perennials arising from thick rootstocks that are native to temperate regions around the Northern Hemisphere.
They prefer full sun to partial shade on moist soils.
All parts of plant are poisonous. They are deer and rabbit resistant but can be prone to slugs. Propagation is from ripened seed or division done during autumn or early spring.

* photo taken by J.E. Schwartz @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Veratrum album ( European White Hellebore )
A rhizomatous perennial, reaching up to 6.5 feet, that is native from Europe through northern Asia.
The broad-elliptical leaves, up to 12 x 6 inches in size, are glossy bright green.
The greenish-white flowers, up to 1 inch wide, are borne on panicles, up to 2 feet in length, during early to mid-summer.
Hardy zones 3 to 6 in full sun to partial shade on moist, deep, fertile, well drained soil.

Veratrum californicum ( California False Hellebore )
A perennial, reaching up to 6 feet in height, that is native to western North America ( Washington State to western Montana; south to southern California to central New Mexico ).
The cupped leaves, up to 16 x 8 inches in size, are green. The occur along the entire length of the stems up to the flowerhead.
The greenish-white flowers are borne on large heads.
Hardy zones 5 to 8. Propagation is from seed or division.

* photo taken by Paul Fair @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* photo taken by C.A. Kutzleb @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

* USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database


Veratrum nigrum ( Black False Hellebore )
A large, rhizomatous perennial, reaching up to 4 + feet, that is a widespread native to temperate Eurasia.
The very attractive broad-elliptical leaves are luxuriant mid-green.
The small, very dark brown flowers, up to 0.3 inches wide, are borne on panicles up to 3 feet in length.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on moist, deep, fertile, well drained soil, it is tolerant of deep shade.

Veratrum viride ( Green False Hellebore )
A perennial, reaching up to 6 x 2 feet. It eventually clumps out like Hostas. It is native to moist woodlands and swamps in western North America ( Alaska to Northwest Territories; south to northern California to Wyoming ) as well as northeastern North America ( from northeast Ohio to Quebec & Labrador; south to the Smoky Mountains ).
The ovate leaves are strongly ribbed.
The abundant, yellowish-green flowers are borne during early to mid summer.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial shade on a site protected from wind. It does not enjoy extreme heat or hot humid summers.
Phamacology: All parts of this plant are poisonous.

Friday, August 8, 2014

Lizard's Tail

Saururus

Saururus cernuus
A rhizomatous perennial, reaching up to 4.5 feet, that forms extensive colonies in marshes, swamps and streambanks. It is native to North America ( eastern Kansas to Wisconsin to Ontario to Quebec to Massachusetts; south to central Texas to southern Florida ).
The pointed, heart-shaped leaves, up to 6.5 inches in length, are mid-green.
The fragrant, greenish-white flowers are borne early summer to early autumn.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on wet soil to water up to 12 inches deep.

* photos taken on June 30 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, DC

* photos taken on June 1 2014 @ Maryland Horticulturalist Society garden tour, Clarksville

* photos taken on Aug 3 2014 @ National Zoo, Washington, DC


Saururus chinensis
A perennial, reaching up to 4 feet in height.
The cordate leaves are up to 8 x 4 inches.

Snowflake

Leucojum

* photo of unknown internet source


Leucojum aestivum ( Summer Snowflake )
A bulbous perennial, reaching up to 2 x 1.5 feet, that is native to Europe.
The linear leaves are glossy green.
The lightly-fragrant, pendulous, white, bell-shaped flowers are borne during mid-spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on moist or wet, humus-rich soil. The bulbs should be planted 4 to 6 inches deep and 6 to 8 inches apart. They are clay, drought, rabbit and deer resistant.

'Gravetye Giant'
Larger than species, reaching 2 feet in height.

Leucojum vernuum ( Spring Snowflake )
A bulbous perennial, reaching up to 1 foot in height, that is native to Europe.
The linear leaves are glossy green.
The lightly-fragrant, pendulous, white, bell-shaped flowers are borne during early spring.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on moist or wet, humus-rich soil. The bulbs should be planted 4 to 6 inches deep and 6 to 8 inches apart. They are rabbit and deer resistant.

Fawn Lilies

Erythronium
A genus of perennial bulbs that thrive in the shade of deciduous trees on deep, fertile, moist, well drained soil ( however they only need abundant moisture while actively growing.
They can be propagated from bulbs, offsets as well as seed which is much slower.
Over time plants may spread to form large colonies. The bulbs of most species are planted 2 to 3 inches deep and 0.5 feet apart. Some of the largers ones are planted 5 or more inches deep. The bulbs are planted during autumn. If the bulbs dry out during division or planting, they will not survive. It takes seedlings at least 3 years to bloom, however the wait is well worth it.

* photo taken by J.E. Broaddus @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database

Erythronium albidum ( White Fawn Lily )
A perennial, native to eastern North America ( from northwest Minnesota to Ontario & New York State; south to central Texas to Georgia ).
The leaves are mid-green with purplish mottling.
The flowers are white.

* photos taken on March 28 2010 @ U.S. National Arboretum, D.C.




Erythronium americanum ( Yellow Trout Lily )
A perennial, reaching up to 1 foot in height, that is native to rich woods and bottomlands in eastern North America ( northeast Minnesota to Newfoundland; south to Louisiana to South Carolina ).
The foliage is bright green with deep purple mottling.
The yellow flowers are borne early to mid spring.

Erythronium californicum ( California Fawn Lily )
A perennial, reaching up to 14 x 6 inches in size, that is native to northern California.
The elliptical leaves are glossy mid-green with deep purplish-brown markings.
The white flowers are borne up to 3 per stem.
Hardy zones 5 ot 8 in partial shade on humus-rich, acidic, well drained soil.

Erythronium caucasicum
A perennial, reaching up to 6 inches in height, that is native to the western Caucasus and northern Iran. It is great for the woodland rock garden.
The ovate leaves, up to 2.4 x 1.3 inches in size, are blue-green and spotted.
The solitary, white flowers are borne early to mid-spring.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 ( 4 on protected sites ) in partial to full shade on just about any well drained soil. Transplant during late summer.

Erythronium citrinum
A perennial, reaching up to 1 foot in height, bearing creamy-white ( throated pale yellow ) flowers up to 1.5 inches wide.
Hardy zones 6 to 8.

Erythronium dens-canis ( European Dogtooth Violet )
A perennial, reaching up to 14 x 4 ( rarely over 8 ) inches in size, that is native to southern and southeast Europe.
The elliptical leaves are mid-green or blue-green with bronze mottling.
The flowers, up to 2 inches wide, are pink ( sometimes white or purple ).
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial shade or deciduous shade on humus-rich, acidic, well drained soil.

Erythronium grandiflorum ( Yellow Avalanche Lily )
A perennial, reaching up to 2 feet in height, that is native to the Rocky Mountains in western North America ( from British Columbia to Alberta; south to northern California to northern New Mexico ).
The elliptical leaves are glossy mid-green with no markings.
The flowers are intense bright yellow to golden-yellow ( with red anthers ). The flowers are borne on clusters.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial shade on humus-rich, acidic, well drained soil.

Erythronium helenae ( Pacific Fawn Lily )
A perennial, reaching up to 14 x 6 inches in size, that is native to northwestern California. It is related to E. californicum.
The elliptical leaves are bright green.
The creamy-white ( centered yellow ) flowers are borne during mid-spring.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in partial shade on humus-rich, acidic, well drained soil.

Erythronium japonicum
A perennial, reaching only 6 inches in height, that is native to Sakhaklin & Kuril Islands, Korea and Japan.
It is very closely related and similar to Erythronium dens-canis.
Hardy zones 3 to 8.

Erythronium oregonum ( Giant Fawn Lily )
Reaches up to 1 foot and is native to the Pacific Northwest from British Columbia to southwest Oregon.
The white flowers are borne during early spring.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in partial to full shade.

Erythronium 'Pagoda'
The hybrid between E. revolutum & E. tuilumnense, forming a vigorous, tuberous perennial, reaching up to 14 inches in height.
The broad-elliptical foliage is luxuriant mid-green with bronze mottling.
The intense bright yellow are borne up to 10 per stem.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in deciduous shade on a moist, humus-rich, acidic, well drained soil. Clumps can be divided after flowering is complete.

Erythronium revolutum ( Coast Fawn Lily )
A perennial, reaching up to 1.3 foot, and is native to the Pacific Northwest from Vancouver Island to northern California.
The bright pink ( sometimes white or lavender ) flowers, up to 1.5 inches wide, are borne during early spring.
hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial to full shade.

Erythronium sibericum
A perennial, reaching up to 1 foot that is native to the Altay and western Sayan in Siberia; south to eastern Kazakstan. It eventually spreads to form large patches.
The elliptical leaves, up to 8 x 3 inches, have reddish spots.
The pale lilac ( with yellow anthers ) flowers are borne during mid-spring. All white flowering forms exist.
Hardy zones 3 to 6 on well drained soil.

Erythronium tuolumnense ( Tuolumne Fawn Lily )
A vigorous perennial, reaching up to 14 inches in height, that is native to lower elevations of the Sierra Nevada mountains in California.
The elliptical leaves, up to 12 inches in length, are bright green.
The bright yellow flowers, up to 1.3 inches wide, are borne during spring. Up to 7 flowers may be borne per stem.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial to full shade on humus-rich, acidic, well drained soil. Propagation is from division every 3 to 4 years.

'Pagoda'
A perennial, reaching up to 1 foot, that is native to lower elevations of the Sierra Nevada mountains in California.
The pale yellow flowers are borne during spring.
Hardy zones 4 to 8 in partial to full shade. Propagation is from division every 3 to 4 years.

Everlasting Pea

Lathyrus
Lathyrus aureus
A perennial, reaching up to 2 feet in height, that is native to woodlands from Romania to the Caucasus; south to northern Turkey.
The pinnate leaves are composed of 3 to 6 pairs of leaflets.
The yellow flowers, up to 0.8 inches long, later fade to orange.

Lathytus heterophyllus
A climber, reaching up to 4 feet, that is native to central and southern Europe.
The purplish-pink flowers are borne during mid-summer.

Lathyrus latifolius ( Everlasting Pea )
A vigorous, perennial vine, reaching up to 10 feet in height, that is native to Eurasia ( from France to Poland to southern Russia; south to Portugal to the Caucasus ). It is commonly found naturalized in the British Isles and North America. This herbaceous vine originates from a thick root stock.
The leaves, up to 6 x 2 inches in size, are composed of ovate leaflets. The foliage is dull green.
The flowers, up to 0.7 inches across, are borne early summer to early autumn. The flowers can be white, pink or purple.
Excellent external link:
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=120&taxon_id=242442441

* photos taken on Aug 1 2013 in Goderich, Ontario

* photos taken on Aug 4 2013 in Bayfield, Ontario


'Lancer'
text coming soon

* Photo courtesy of USDA NRCS.


Lathyrus nigra ( Black Pea )
Reaches up to 3 feet in height.
The foliage turns to black during autumn.
The small purplish ( later fading to blue ) flowers are borne on long sprays.

Lathyrus rotundifolius
A perennial, reaching up to 6.5 x 1.5 feet, that is native to pine forests and meadows from the Caucasus; south to northern Turkey to northern Iran.
The leaves are composed of oval to rounded leaflets that are borne in pairs. The foliage is deep green.
The rosy-pink flowers, up to 1 inch across, are borne on clusters of up to 10 all summer long.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 in full sun to partial shade.

Lathyrus venetus
A shrubby perennial, reaching up to 2 feet, that is native to both grasslands and open woodlands from Italy to central Russia; south to northern Turkey.
The pinnate foliage is glossy bright green. The ovate leaves, up to 2.8 inches in length, are borne in 2 to 4 pairs.
The reddish-purple ( veined darker ) flowers, up to 0.6 inches long, are borne on dense racemes during late spring into early summer.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on moist, deep, fertile, well drained soil. It is very tolerant of alkaline soil. Propagation is from seed soaked in water for 24 hours before sowing during spring.

Lathyrus vernus ( Spring Vetchling )
A deep-rooted, upright, bushy perennial, reaching up to 18 x 20 inches, that is a widespread Eurasian native ( from France to eastern Siberia; south to the Alps to northern Turkey to the Caucasus ).
The pinnate foliage is glossy bright green. The ovate leaves, up to 2.8 inches in length, are borne in 2 to 3 pairs.
The rosy-purple ( white, pink or blue in some cultivars ) flowers, up to 0.7 x 0.5 inches across, are borne during mid to late spring. Hardy zones 3b to 6 in full sun to partial shade on moist, deep, fertile, well drained soil. It is very tolerant of alkaline soil. Propagation is from seed soaked in water for 24 hours before sowing during spring.



'Albus'
Flowers are white.

'Caeruleus'
Flowers are blue.

'Rosea'
Flowers are pink.

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Sweeet Cicely

Myrrhis odorata
A deep-rooted, mounding perennial, reaching up to 5 x 6 feet, that is a widespread native of moist woodlands and riverbanks in Europe.
The attractive, lacy foliage is bright green.
The fragrant, white, starry flowers are borne on umbels up to 2 inches wide, during late spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 7 in full sun to partial shade on cool, moist, fertile, well drained soil. Cut back flowering stems after flowering unless seeds are desired for propagation ( which it often needs no help doing ).

* photos taken on May 21 2014 @ Hampton Ntl Historic Site, Towson, MD

Tuesday, July 8, 2014

Navelwort

Omphalodes

Omphalodes cappadocica
A slow-spreading, clumping perennial, reaching up to 1 x 1 foot in size, that is native to moist deciduous woodlands in northern Turkey.
The pointed, ovate leaves are up to 3.5 x 2 inches in size. The dull green foliage ranges from semi-evergreen to evergreen depending on climate.
The blue flowers, up to 0.3 inches wide, are borne early to mid-spring, however sporadic blooms may continue appear to late autumn.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 in partial to full shade on consistently moist, humus-rich, well drained soil. It is tolerant of alkaline soil. They are easy to grow in woodland conditions. Propagation is from division during early spring.

'Cherry Ingram'
Lance-shaped leaves, up to 7 x 2 inches in size, and abundant, large blue flowers.

'Starry Eyes'
Reaches up to 1 x 1.5 feet in size, bearing flowers that are deep blue variegated with a white edge.

Omphalodes verna
A perennial, reaching up to 8 inches x 3 feet, that is native to moist mountain forests from central Italy to Romania, though also naturalized in much of western Europe.
The cordate, ovate leaves, up to 8 x 2.3 inches in size, are bright green.
The pale-violet flowers, up to 0.4 inches wide, are borne during early to mid spring.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in shade on just about any moist, humus-rich soil.

Fennel

Foeniculum vulgare ( Fennel )
A deeply-rooted perennial, reaching up to 7 x 3 feet, that is a widespread native of western and southern Europe as well as around the Mediterranean. The fine-textured foliage is aromaric. The greenish-yellow flowers are borne on umbels during mid to late summer. It is suggested to deadhead old blooms as seedlings can be a nuisance. Hardy zones 4 to 9 in full sun on fertile, well drained soil.
Pharmacology: The body converts large quantities of Fennel into a type of Amphetamine causing hullucinations.
Aphids avoid it, it can be planted behind plants that may be prone to aphids as a natural defense.
* photos taken on June 23 2013 @ U.S. National Arboretum, Washington, DC


'Giant Bronze'
Similar to 'Purpureum' but very vigorous and larger.

'Purpureum' ( Bronze Fennel )
Bronze-purple foliage.

* photos taken @ U.S. Botanical Garden, Wash., DC on Aug 25 2014

Fritillaria

Fritillaria
A genus of bulbs native to western North America that require moist winters, spring moisture and dry summers. These bulbs require well drained soil and absolutely hate transplanting. Plant bulbs 4 times deeper than the width of the bulb. Divide bulbs at the same time as cutting back withered foliage.

* photo of unknown internet source


Fritillaria acmopetala
Reaches up to 20 inches, it is a native of Asia Minor.
The linear flowers are blue-green.
The hanging flowers are olive green and marked / striped purple. They are borne during late spring
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun on just about any well drained soil.

Fritillaria affinis
Reaching up to 3 feet in height, it is a woodland native to western North America from Alaska to California.
The lance-shaped leaves are mid-green.
The nodding flowers are variable in color.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in partial shade on light, well drained soil.

Fritillaria assyriaca ( Purple Fritillary )
Reaches up to 20 inches, with nodding, purple ( yellow inside ) flowers that are borne on branched stems.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun on very well drained soil..
Fritillaria biflora ( Black Fritillary )
Reaches up to 15 inches, with purplish ( edged in cream ) flowers during spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun to partial shade on very well drained soil.

Fritillaria camschatcensis (Kamchatka Lily )
Reaches up to 2 feet, and is native from Alaska to Oregon.
The flowers, up to 1 inch in length, are deep red to black, borne during mid spring. Up to 6 flowers may be borne per stem.
Hardy zones 4 to 9 in shade, requiring abundant moisture all year.

Fritillaria crassifolia var kurdica
A native of mountain plateau grasslands in western Asia, reaching only 4 inches in height.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 in full sun on very well drained soil. It does not thrive where summers are wet.

Fritillaria davisii
Reaches up to 10 inches in height, with reddish-purple flowers.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun on very well drained soil.

Fritillaria grandiflora
A rare native of the Caucasus, bearing very showy, brownish-purple checkered flowers, up to 2.4 inches wide.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 ( 5 on protected sites ) in full sun on very well drained soil.

Fritillaria imperialis ( Crown Imperial )
A perennial bulb reaching up to 2.5 feet in height. It is endangered in its native range.
The pointed, lance-shaped leaves are glossy bright green. They are borne in whorls around the stem.
The stems are topped by large, orange flowers, up to 2 inches in length.
Hardy zones 4 to 7 in full sun on fertile, very well drained soil. The bulbs should be planted 8 inches deep and 1.5 inches apart, during early to mid autumn.

* photo taken on Apr 16 2014 in Columbia, MD


'Aureomarginata'
Variegated.

'Maxima Lutea'
Yellow flowers.

'Rubra Maxima'
Reddish-orange.

* photos of unknown internet source


Fritillaria involucrata
Reaching up to 1 foot in height, it is native to woodlands of southern Europe.
The mid-spring, nodding flowers are olive-green with purple mottling.
Hardy zones 7 to 9 in partial shade on very well drained soil. It sometimes self sows in the woodland garden.

Fritillaria lanceolata ( Checker Lily )
A perennial, reaching up to 20 inches, that is native to western North America ( from British Columbia to Idaho; south to northern California ).
The checkered greenish-yellow and purple flowers are borne during spring.
Hardy zones 6 to 9 in full sun to partial shade on very well drained soil.

Fritillaria meleagris ( Guinea Hen Flower )
Reaching up to 15 inches in height, it is native to meadows in Europe.
The linear leaves are gray-green.
The nodding white and heavily mottled deep reddish-purple flowers, up to 1.5 inches in length, are borne during mid-spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial to full shade on moist, humus-rich, well drained soil. It thrives in the woodland environment.
Drought tolerant while dormant but requires consistent moisture during spring. The bulbs should be planted 5 inches deep and 6 inches apart during early autumn. Deer resistant.

'Alba'
White flowers.

Fritillaria michailovskyi
A native to the Turkish mountains, it reaches up to 1 foot in height.
The very attractive, deep reddish-purple flowers, up to 1 inch in length, are edged in yellow. Up to 5 flowers may be borne per stem during late spring.
The oblanceolate leaves are mid-green.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun on very well drained soil.

Fritillaria pallidiflora
Reaching up to 16 inches in height.
The attractive, lance-shaped leaves are gray-green.
The showy, bright greenish-yellow, nodding flowers, up to 1.5 inches in length, are borne on clusters during mid-spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in partial shade on moist, well drained soil. This easy to grow bulbaceous perennial often self sows in the woodland garden.

Fritillaria persica ( Yellow Fritillary )
Reaching up to 3 feet x 8 inches in size, it is native to western Asia from Turkey to Iraq. It is endangered in its natural range. It looks best planted in groups.
The narrow, lance-shaped leaves are gray-green.
The fragrant flowers, up to 1 inch wide, are deep purple. The very abundant flowers may number up to 30 per stem.
Hardy zones 6 to 8 in full sun on fertile, very well drained soil, it needs protection from late spring frosts. The bulbs should be planted 6 inches deep and 1 foot apart during early to mid autumn.

Fritillaria pudica
Reaches up to 6 inches in height, it is native to mountains of the western U.S.
The lance-shaped leaves are mid-green.
The fragrant flowers are borne during early spring.
Hardy zones 3 to 8 in full sun on very well drained soil.

Fritillaria raddeana Closely related to F. imperialis, it reaches up to 2.5 feet in height. It is native to northeastern Iran. The fragrant, creamy-yellow flowers are borne during early spring. Hardy zones 5 to 9, late spring freezes may be a problem.

Fritillaria recurva ( Scarlet Fritillaria )
Reaches up to 3 feet, and is native to the western U.S., from southern Oregon; south to northern California to nw Nevada.
The scarlet ( checkered yellow on the inside ) flowers are borne during spring.
Hardy zones 5 to 9 in light shade. Very hardy and adaptable, thriving in much of the U.S. and southern Canada.

Fritillaria thunbergii
The foliage is grassy
It prefers full sun and moist soil.

Fritillaria purdyi
The leaves, up to 6 inches in length, form a rosette.
The white ( striped reddish-brown ) flowers are borne on a stem up to 6 inches high. Up to 7 flowers may be borne per stem.
Hardy zones 5 to 8.

Fritillaria uva-vulpis
Reaches up to 1.5 feet in height.
The narrow lance-shaped leaves are gray.
The flowers are purple with yellow petal tips.
Hardy zones 3 to 8.

Fritillaria verticillata
Reaches up to 2 feet in height and is native to the mountains of central Asia.
The leaves are narrow and grass-like.
The flowers, up to 1.5 inches in length, are nodding and white to pale yellow. There is purple spotting on the inside.
Hardy zones 5 to 8 in full sun on moist, well drained soil.